USA / 1967 / English

Directed by Joseph L. Anderson

With Larue Hall, Ted Heimerdinger, Marjorie Johnson

Still from 'Spring Night, Summer Night'A young man named Carl stands in his backyard shooing the headlights out of a tractor with a shotgun. Well-built, neat, with a crest of blonde hair, he seems out of place – the land around him is muddy, chaotic with refuse both human and natural. But the destructive emptiness of his activity sums up the fact of being stuck where he is, with his quarrelsome family in Southern Ohio. Could this place, between rust belt and Appalachia, have ever been vibrant? If it once was, it now breathes indigence. The mining industry that boomed there has withered up and gone, leaving equally withered people – but who can’t leave – in its place. Read the rest of this entry »

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Takva

05/15/2017

Turkey / 2006 / Turkish

Directed by Özer Kızıltan

With Erkan Can, Güven Kiraç, Meray Ülgen

Still from 'Takva'Muharrem is a follower, in every sense of the word. Middle-aged and solitary, he works as peon for a plastic bag merchant. In the evenings, he joins throngs of men at the mosque of the Sufi sect to which he belongs. Of this world but not in it, he follows God with a similar degree of subservience, living a gray, spartan life in his tiny apartment, and abstaining from any contact with women. He drinks tea, but only makes coffee for his (very infrequent) guests. Thus he keeps his world hermetic, and therefore clean. Read the rest of this entry »

syphon10

The coffee siphon (also known as the vacuum coffee pot) makes brief, innocuous appearances now and again in films. Its design has changed little since the 1830s, when it was first patented in Germany. And indeed, the glass bell and bulb suspended by a retort stand over a flame suggest both ornamental and scientific Victoriana, its utilization a delicate and ritualistic art, like alchemy or a seance. Mediocre cafés will use it solely for decoration. Its subtle presence as a status symbol persists through occasional sightings in cinema. Read the rest of this entry »